Outside the Classroom

May’s Top Books on Education: See What’s Coming Out This Month!

Every month, hundreds of new books for educators are released, so finding informative and inspiring material can be time-consuming. To better help you, your students, and your coworkers, we’ve put together a list of May’s top books on education. Covering such topics as leadership skills for mathematics, essentials of intensive intervention, and tips for raising successful people, these books are full of great information to help you better serve your students and do your job. Check out what we picked for you this month!

How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results
Esther Wojcicki

The Godmother of Silicon Valley, legendary teacher, and mother of a Super Family shares her tried-and-tested methods for raising happy, healthy, successful children using Trust, Respect, Independence, Collaboration, and Kindness: TRICK.

Esther Wojcicki—“Woj” to her many friends and admirers—is famous for three things: teaching a high school class that has changed the lives of thousands of kids, inspiring Silicon Valley legends like Steve Jobs, and raising three daughters who have each become famously successful. What do these three accomplishments have in common? They’re the result of TRICK, Woj’s secret to raising successful people: Trust, Respect, Independence, Collaboration, and Kindness. Simple lessons, but the results are radical.

Wojcicki’s methods are the opposite of helicopter parenting. As we face an epidemic of parental anxiety, Woj is here to say relax. Talk to infants as if they are adults. Allow teenagers to pick projects that relate to the real world and their own passions and let them figure out how to complete them. Above all, let your child lead. How to Raise Successful People: Simple Lessons for Radical Results offers essential lessons for raising, educating, and managing people to their highest potential. Change your parenting, change the world.

Sovereign Schools: How Shoshones and Arapahos Created a High School on the Wind River Reservation
Martha Louise Hipp

Sovereign Schools: How Shoshones and Arapahos Created a High School on the Wind Reservation tells the epic story of one of the early battles for reservation public schools. For centuries indigenous peoples in North America have struggled to preserve their religious practices and cultural knowledge by educating younger generations but have been thwarted by the deeply corrosive effects of missionary schools, federal boarding schools, Bureau of Indian Affairs reservation schools, and off-reservation public schools. Martha Louise Hipp describes the successful fight through sustained Native community activism for public school sovereignty during the late 1960s and 1970s on the Shoshone and Arapaho tribes’ Wind River Indian Reservation in Wyoming.

Parents and students at Wind River experienced sustained educational discrimination in their school districts, particularly at the high schools located in towns bordering the reservation, not least when these public schools failed to incorporate history and culture of the Shoshones and Arapahos into the curriculum.

Focusing on one of the most significant issues of indigenous activism of the era, Sovereign Schools: How Shoshones and Arapahos Created a High School on the Wind Reservation tells the story of how Eastern Shoshones and Northern Arapahos asserted tribal sovereignty in the face of immense local, state, and federal government pressure, even from the Nixon administration itself, which sent mixed signals to reservations by promoting indigenous “self-determination” while simultaneously impounding federal education funds for Native peoples. With support from the Coalition of Indian Controlled School Boards and the Episcopal Church, the Wind River peoples overcame federal and local entities to reclaim their reservation schools and educational sovereignty.

Leading Primary Mathematics
Catherine Foley, Jane McNeill, and Stephanie Suter

This book provides guidance and insight into ‘what mathematics leadership looks like in practice’ and shows readers how they can develop from a confident teacher into a curriculum subject leader. It does this through a careful blend of pedagogy and practical application, supported by a range of real-world case studies and opportunities to reflect critically on classroom practice. Key coverage includes:

  • The planning and application that underpins subject leadership
  • How international perspectives can influence leadership of mathematics
  • How to develop fluency through problem solving and reasoning
  • How to champion inclusive practice in mathematics
  • Assessing children’s understanding

This is essential reading for anyone studying primary mathematics on initial teacher education courses, including undergraduate (BA Ed, BA with QTS) and postgraduate (PGCE, PGDE, School Direct and SCITT) routes, NQTs seeking to develop into curriculum leadership roles and those already leading mathematics in their school.

Essentials of Intensive Intervention
Rebecca Zumeta Edmonds, Allison Gruner Gandhi, and Louis Danielson

Few evidence-based resources exist for supporting elementary and secondary students who require intensive intervention—typically Tier 3 within a multi-tiered system of support (MTSS). Filling a gap in the field, this book brings together leading experts to present data-based individualization (DBI), a systematic approach to providing intensive intervention which is applicable to reading, math, and behavior. Key components of the DBI process are explained in detail, including screening, progress monitoring, and the use and ongoing adaptation of validated interventions. The book also addresses ways to ensure successful, sustained implementation and provides application exercises and FAQs. Readers are guided to access and utilize numerous free online DBI resources—tool charts, planning materials, sample activities, downloadable forms, and more.

Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work
Bianca J. Baldridge

Approximately 2.4 million Black youth participate in after-school programs, which offer a range of support, including academic tutoring, college preparation, political identity development, cultural and emotional support, and even a space to develop strategies and tools for organizing and activism. In Reclaiming Community: Race and the Uncertain Future of Youth Work, Bianca Baldridge tells the story of one such community-based program, Educational Excellence (EE), shining a light on both the invaluable role youth workers play in these spaces, and the precarious context in which such programs now exist.

Drawing on rich ethnographic data, Baldridge persuasively argues that the story of EE is representative of a much larger and understudied phenomenon. With the spread of neoliberal ideology and its reliance on racism—marked by individualism, market competition, and privatization—these bastions of community support are losing the autonomy that has allowed them to embolden the minds of the youth they serve. Baldridge captures the stories of loss and resistance within this context of immense external political pressure, arguing powerfully for the damage caused when the same structural violence that Black youth experience in school, starts to occur in the places they go to escape it.

Did you miss last month’s recommendations? It’s not too late to see April’s top books on education!

About the Author

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Ryan Zaharako

Ryan is a former Marine who graduated from The University of Texas at Austin with a B.S. in Radio/TV/Film with a focus on writing. In 2005, he became a copywriter in entertainment advertising in Hollywood, California before recently joining the marketing team at Edgenuity. Ryan is excited to be working in the rewarding world of education technology.